Podcast: Music Piracy

Is it really stealing?

Is it wrong to download music without paying for it? How often do you purchase CDs? Do you share music files with friends? The full Discussion Starters lesson contains warm up questions, pre-reading vocabulary, a short reading, vocabulary review activities, comprehension questions and discussion questions. We hope the topic of music piracy sparks an interesting discussion in your class. Some of your students may be decide they no longer want to download music without paying for it. Others will think back to the time when we all used to use cassette tapes to record music off the radio. Preview all of ESL-Library’s current and upcoming Discussion Starters here.

Coming soon…Hazing.

Please introduce your students to our FREE podcasts. These can act as a preview to our Discussion Starter lessons or as extra listening homework. You can also use our weekly podcast (every Wednesday) as a warm up for an online tutoring session. If you like using our podcasts with your English learners, check out iTunes to see which other podcasts our listeners enjoy!

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  1. raindancermystico@yahoo.com'

    Sarah says:

    Feb 2, 2012 at 9:44 pm

    With regards to music piracy and from an ethical standpoint, I believe an artist has every right to be angry and seek legal action when their recordings are unwillingly sold for profit or bootlegged by a shady record label or download site. It’s the intellectual property of the artist, who typically writes and composes their own songs. Not to mention, the artist has developed their own way of performing a song, which is documented within the recording.

    In 2011, a judge ruled in favor of singer Paul Collins, whose rock group The Beat lost substantial revenue from a series of unauthorized bootleg recordings released by an underground record label. The recordings were unknowingly engineered during The Beat’s tours with The Police, Eddie Money and The Cure. Although the label argued that the recordings were tracked and mixed by an independent investor during the 1970s and 1980s, Collins was unaware of these dealings and was awarded an unspecified amount of damages. Collins was granted permission to digitally re-master and officially release the live recordings. In response to backlash and negative publicity from fans accusing him of being greedy, Collins attempted to make a public statement about piracy. In 2012, Collins made the recordings available to everyone as free MP3 download tracks to fans worldwide.

    Some fans might argue that Metallica was selfish to target Napster for illegally offering their music as MP3s. In all fairness, not everyone victimized by piracy are platinum-selling, wealthy artists in the caliber of Metallica. Paul Collins had just as much right to take legal action, but he turned the negative situation into a positive one by publicly releasing the pirated material as free downloads to his fans. Case in point, not all rock stars are selfish or “only in it for the money.” Musicians have a right to be paid for their intellectual property. People who support music piracy only think about themselves. If a musician isn’t being paid for their work, how are they supposed to continue recording, writing, performing and touring? Musicians aren’t slaves and if they aren’t making enough money to function, then they might choose a different career path that doesn’t involve making music.

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