Our Favorite Posts from 2016

On the ESL Library blog, we offer a variety of posts for teachers of English. You’ll find tips for teaching grammar, reviews of conference sessions, ideas for using tech and authentic materials, and even free listening practice for your students. Our team also provides news and tips about using ESL Library lessons and resources. Here’s a little taste of what our blog had to offer in 2016!


12 Ways To Use Twitter with Language Learners

Over 75,000 Twitter users follow English language teacher, author, and speaker @ShellTerrell. It’s no wonder she has so many great ideas for using Twitter with ELLs. You may also want to try our Writing in English lesson on How to Tweet.


Teaching English with Selfie Videos

This TESOL 16 session featured three inspiring ESL teachers who helped us come up with a new task that appears in many of our projects and discussion-based lessons.


English Sentence Patterns

Our editor encourages teachers to go beyond SVO! She explains how to lay out the basic sentence patterns in English in order to help ELLs recognize parts of speech and correct their own speaking and writing mistakes.


5 Key Components to Project-Based Learning

We did a lot of research into project-based learning in 2016 and have published our first six Group Projects. If you’re nervous or unsure about integrating project-based learning in your classes, take a look at this post!


14 Free Web Tools and Apps for Students to Present Their Knowledge

Just in time for our new Group Projects section, Shelly Terrell shared a large list of tools and apps for students to use in their presentations.


10 Ways to Use Famous People Flashcards

Did you get a chance to check out our new set of Famous People Flashcards in 2016? Here are 10 ways to use this new set. Be sure to try the Famous People lessons too!


Present Perfect: Two Uses

As one blog reader commented to our editor about these grammar teaching tips, “Yours is by far the clearest and the best explanation! Impressive!”


Present Perfect Vs. Present Progressive

This follow-up post encourages teachers to use charts to explain the differences between the present perfect and the present perfect progressive.


Listening to English En Route

This post challenges teachers to simplify ELL homework by asking teachers to assign a daily dose of listening homework that students can complete on the way to or from school. Our weekly podcast is a great place to start.


Embedded Questions

As Tanya explains in her post, embedded questions cause confusion for ELLs because they follow a normal Subject-Verb-Object pattern instead of a typical inverted question pattern. Tanya’s tips and example sentences will help you teach this tricky grammar point. Watch for an upcoming Grammar Practice Worksheet lesson on this target coming Feb. 1.


ELT Community

English language teachers drive the content on ESL Library. Our subscribers tell us what lessons and resources they need, and our team works hard to develop these materials in a timely manner. We’d like to offer a similar type of service on our blog. Please leave a comment and let us know what types of posts you want to see in 2017.

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  1. rachelcox@anderson5.net'

    Rachel says:

    Jan 21, 2017 at 12:31 pm

    Hello. Thank you for all your helpful lessons and information. I teach adult learners in the United States, and there is a renewed emphasis here on helping to prepare students for the workplace. I am particularly interested in content and skills related to the workplace. Thank you!

    Reply

  2. gail.o.murray@gmail.com'

    Gail says:

    Jan 19, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    Love your site and use it constantly for a variety of learners. Would be great to have some assessment material, if possible , and some ‘younger learner’ (6-12yrs) material. Thank you so much for all you provide!

    Reply

    • Tara Benwell says:

      Jan 19, 2017 at 8:16 pm

      Hi Gail,

      Thanks for stopping by our blog! We’ve started adding assessment material to some of our new and updated lessons, including all of our Everyday Dialogues lessons. Our sister site (Sprout English) has all of our materials for young learners, but we will be merging very soon. You can check it out at http://www.sproutenglish.com to get an idea of what we offer there. Stay tuned!

      Reply

  3. michaelmurphy996@gmail.com'

    Michael Murphy says:

    Jan 19, 2017 at 3:49 pm

    This is such a revelation! I have discovered ESL library by chance and I will certainly remain a subscriber.
    I have considerable experience in teaching English as an additional language to school students and adults. Since retiring from school teaching and qualifying as an editor, my niche has been helping tertiary students for whom English is not their first language. I do this by helping them learn to edit their essays and theses and develop their own writing style. For the last six years I have also been teaching English at the St Bakhita Centre, a Catholic Sudanese Refugee Centre in Sydney. In this instance I went online looking for assistance with conversational English. Within a few days of discovering ESL library, perhaps serendipitously, a large professionally designed banner has appeared on the front fence of our local Presbyterian Church fence.
    Thank you.
    Michael Murphy

    Reply

    • Tara Benwell says:

      Jan 19, 2017 at 8:20 pm

      Hi Michael,

      Thanks so much for sharing your experience. We’re so happy you found us and are glad to hear that your subscription helps you teach your conversation classes! Let us know if you or your students have any special requests this year.

      Cheers,
      Tara

      Reply

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